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please note the correct spelling of the word is supination.

                   I believe that a certain degree of pronation is normal,
if the foot is it's optimum position during the gait cycle.
If too much supination is present then the foot does not pronate,
the heel does not evert when it should, and the internal rotation
of the leg does not occur. If the leg does not internally rotate
then the knee cannot flex. The knee flexion is needed to absorb
shock. Thus abnornal foot function possibly can cause other problems in the
body for which your medical doctor can examine, diagnose and treat. A podiatrist can treat the abnormal supination which I believe is the
foot not pronating when it should.
                    An example of "abnormal supination" which is
also known by me as "hypersupination" or "hypopronation"
can be found by the gait analysis of a patient and also
from the findings of your static exam. ( Generally the findings
of a static exam should confirm the findings of a
gait analysis of biomechanics occuring in the foot. Please keep in mind that there are triplanal suprastructural influences that influence the foot
and the foot can compensate either normally or abnormally. There is
normal and abnormal compensation occuring in the foot).  At the New York
College of Podiatric Medicine I learned that when the
subtalar joint is held in it's neutral position, and the longitudinal
axis of the midfoot is maximally pronated especially in the
frontal plane, then the first metatarsal phalangeal joint is
relatively plantarflexed with regards to the other metatarsal
heads. The abnormal compensation that occurs if this joint is rigid
but not flexible causes the rearfoot to abnormally supinate ( a great
deal of motion is occuring on the frontal plane during this
abnormal supination) at that
point in the gait cycle when it should be pronating. Again
pronation of the rearfoot is where the calcaneous everts and
dorsiflexes and the talar head is plantarflexing. With this in mind,
the leg does not internally rotate as it normally should and
the knee cannot flex and so there is a decreased ability
for the knee joint to absorb shock. I believe the knee was the
major shock absorber. I believe this could possibly lead to ankle and foot inversion sprains and injuries especially during certain sports. All this is only some of what I learned while I was a  student at the NYCPM. I am very grateful to all my teachers at NYCPM for all that they taught me. All my teachers there were mostly podiatrists who have given me
the biomechanical knowledge that enabled me to better treat my patients. Please understand that there are other theories in the orthopedic texts. For example, when the calcaneous everts, the foot becomes more rigid.
This is totally the opposite of what I learned at
NYCPM. (I believe theory in general can be very
interesting. However, every runner, patient with a
biomechanical fault is a seperate clinical patient.
Through trial and error even the use of felt propperly
placed in one's shoes or sneakers can dramatically affect
gait.)
                    I am now looking to see if certain sneakers, shoes
or orthotics can help accomodate such abnormal supination.

Disclaimer: None of the above is to be taken to be medical advice
to be relied upon. If you have any abnormal supination please
consult with your podiatrist or medical doctor to examine,
diagnose and treat this. The above opinion given does not
apply to everyone.
                                       
                                                          
                           


DR CHASKIN PODIATRIST 


I AM BOARD CERTIFIED BY THE AMERICAN BOARD OF PODIATRIC ORTHOPEDICS AND PRIMARY PODIATRIC MEDICINE.